Climb the pyramid at the Mayan Ruins at coba

A little history about the Coba Ruins

Coba means ?waters stirred by the wind?, an appropriate Mayan name as this settlement is surrounded by two large lagoons. For many years Coba was an ignored piece of Mayan history due to its location. Located between Tulum in the state of Quintana Roo, and Valladolid in the state of Yucatan, archeologists first learned about the site in the mid 1800?s, but dense jungle, the Caste War and lack of funds made this site a difficult area to penetrate. This Mayan site is still largely unexcavated making it a true wonder in the Yucatan. Visitors can enjoy shaded walkways that are the original sacbe (white roads), three settlements that show the architecture and vast area of this once large city, 2 ball courts and climb the highest Mayan pyramid in the Yucatan, Nohoch Mul. We have been visiting Coba since our arrival to the area in the early 90?s and we are still fascinated by this settlement. Cob? was finally opened to the public as an archeological site in1973. Archeologists have estimated that 6,000 structures exist, but only three settlements are for public viewing. what makes this site different from Chichen Itza, Ek Balam, or even Tulum is that Coba is not a single site but a large group of sites connected to the central pyramid, connected by over 16 Mayan ceremonial ?white roads? (sacb?ob). The three main areas that can be viewed in the Coba Ruins are the Nohoch Mul structures (main pyramid), Conjunto Pinturas (spiritual area) and Macanxoc structures (close to the lagoon that bears the same name). Your day at Coba can last up to 2.5 hours if you walk the site, 1.5 hours if you take advantage of the Coba bicycle rentals or in an hour if you opt for the Mayan limo, a chauffeured tricycle where you just sit and take in the sights. Both bicycle options are inexpensive and super fun!

Fast facts about the Coba Ruins

  • Coba means ?waters stirred by wind? or ?ruffled waters? as the Mayan city is located on two lagoons; the Coba Lagoon which can be seen as you drive up to the ruins entrance and Macamxoc Lagoon which can be viewed once you enter the ruin site.
  • The longest sacbe (white road) runs over 100 kilometers (62?mi) westwards to the site of Yaxuna near Chichen Itza
  • The Coba settlement was occupied by a sizable agricultural population by the 1st century and grew to 50,000 inhabitants at the height of its productivity between 600 AD and 900 AD.
  • Coba traded extensively with other Mayan communities as far away as Honduras and as close as Tulum, Xcaret, Xel Ha and Muyil.
  • Coba?s rapid growth was due to control of farmland, trade routes and most importantly, water from the two lagoons.
  • Coba structures show influences from Teotihuacan architecture, evidence that inhabitants had contact with Central Mexico.
  • 120 steps lead up to the top of the Nohoch Mul pyramid, and reaches 137 feet in height. This is the tallest temple pyramid on the Yucatan Peninsula. Chichen Itza has 91 steps leading up to the top of the Kulkulkan Pyramid.
  • The entire site spreads over more than 30 square miles or 80 square kilometers.
  • More than 50 sacbes (white roads) have been discovered within the Coba settlement with 16 open to the public. All roads originate at the main pyramid and stretch out in the four cardinal directions; east, west, north and south.
  • At about 900 or 1000 AD, Coba began a lengthy power struggle with Chich?n Itz?, with Chichen Itza winning in this dispute and becoming the power of the Yucatan.
  • It is believed that the Coba settlement was finally abandoned when the Spanish conquered the Peninsula around 1550.
  • Coba was not studied nor visited until the 1920?s as archeologists could not access the site due to dense jungle and the Caste War.
  • Today, visitors can explore nearby cenotes, Choo Ha and Tamchaha that are a short 10 minute drive from the ruins main entrance. The cenotes are located to the west of Coba village where contemporary Maya live year round.

Making your way through the Coba Ruins

coba ball court and coba day trip ? We have outlined the important artifacts and structures that can be viewed and experienced within the ruins of Coba. We love every aspect of this ruin and hope you enjoy our explanations of these significant areas and structures.

Nohoch Mul Pyramid, the true center of Coba

We always save the best for last, and encourage you to do the same. The main structure and most popular activity at Coba, Nohoch Mul (meaning large hill), is climbing the 42 meters tall (137 feet) pyramid. Be prepared for a 120 steps that lead to an remarkable view of the Yucatan and non-public areas of Coba including both lagoons; Macanxoc Lagoon to the east and Cob? Lagoon to the southwest.

Coba Group

The Coba Group is a series of structures close to the entrance that include the Iglesia (the Church) and one of two ball courts located in this site. Check out the height of a small passage way that is located near the iglesia. Though the iglesia can not be climbed at this time, it does provide a wonderful view of the Macamxoc Lagoon.

Conjunto de Pinturas

The focus of this area is the Pyramid of the Painted Lintel where visitors can see from afar actual paintings on the top temple.

Macanxoc Group

Past the Conjunto de Pinturas is the Macanxoc Group that is found following one of the Sacbes. This area has 8 stelaes and numerous altars. The vast number of stelaes shows that this area was of spiritual significance to the area.

Coba Stelae

There are a large number of stelae, large stone slabs, throughout the Coba site displayed under thatched. The stelae contain drawings and glyphs that document major events and historical facts that happened in the city of Coba. This is what archeologists use to decipher the history and movements of the Mayan culture throughout the area. Today the glyphs are nearly illegible but the history radiates from these important artifacts.

Sacbe ? The importance of the white road

Cob? was an urban hub of many settlements that were joined by roads called sacbes, a very unique feature to this Mayan city. As you walk through Coba, you will be traveling on the same roads of the Maya centuries before. These roads, ranging in width from 10 feet to 30 feet, were constructed by the Maya for commerce. About fifty sacbes have been discovered within the grounds of Coba; with one sacbe reaching 62kms/100km. The effort required to build these wide and long paths exceeded that of stone buildings and temples. The transportation of goods along the sacbes was done by people carrying parcels during the cooler temperatures at night. The white limestone would illuminate from the moonlight and essentially provide ?lights? for travelers to see. Archeologists are stumped by how the Mayans transported their goods, which was on foot, not by wheeled vehicles. Historians have documented that the Maya did not use the wheel or wheeled vehicles to transport their goods on these roads, though they were aware that the wheel existed. ? coba map

Getting to Coba

We made a trip to Coba easy with our travel itinerary to this off the beaten path Mayan ruin. Whether you rent a car, take public transportation or join a group, this is an easy day trip from the Riviera Maya. Coba is best accessed from the Riviera Maya through Tulum taking the famous Coba road found at the first intersection in Tulum. Clear signage is posted for drivers. Travel west (away from the beach) and go about 30 minutes, taking extra precaution at small villages that are known for their speed bumps, to the ruins. Note the road signs at the roundabout just before you reach the village and ruins. Food and lodging can be found near the ruins and we encourage you to try some of the authentic Yucatecan food that cannot be found in the Riviera Maya! That in itself is worth the visit to Coba. Check out other Maya ruins that you can explore in the area.

Mayan city in its primal state

Cob? has the tallest pyramid of all the Mayan ruins in the Yucatan and only a small amount of the site?s buildings excavated. At the height of its population in 400 to 1100 A.D., nearly 50,000 people lived within Cob?. These facts are not readily known by visitors to the area making Cob? an exclusive ruin site.

The site is located on and around 5 lagoons with 3 cenotes close by; the water source for the Mayan settlement. As a major commercial trade center, imports coming into Tulum were trekked to Cob? and further distributed to surrounding Mayan cities. The elaborate system of limestone roads called ?sacbes? (pronounced soc beys) that wind through the site points to the distribution of goods to the surrounding areas. There are 50 documented sacbes that range in width from 10 to 30 ft wide up to a length of 62 miles.

As more visitors seek a deeper understanding of Mayan history, Cob? is becoming a more popular ruins site that people want to visit and explore. The site is enormous, so one of the easiest and fun ways to get around are with Mexican tricycles chauffeured by local drivers. These tricycles are affectionately called ?Mayan Limos? and are a wonderful option for those not looking forward to a long walk. If a personal chauffeur is not on your agenda, rent a bike so you can cover all corners of this Mayan settlement.

We love to walk the site, but understand that this is not the best option for all visitors. The entire site is 80 square kilometers but visitors only have access to a small portion of the buildings. Shade and lagoons create an authentic and cooler experience while checking out Nohoch Mul and the Templo de Iglesia, the two most popular pyramids at Cob?.

Interesting facts about Coba

  • The main pyramid, Nohoch Mul meaning ?large hill?, is 42 meters tall (138 feet), the highest in the Yucatan peninsula.
  • The Templo de la Iglesia, ?Temple of the Church?, is a close second in height, with a great view of Lake Macanxoc at the top.
  • Cob? was built in 100 BC, but encountered most of its activity and its highest population between 400 to 1100 A.D.
  • Only a small percentage of the structures in Cob? are restored or uncovered with an estimated 6,000 structures to be part of this 80 square km site.
  • Discovered in the late 1800s, Cob? remained a mystery until the later 1920s due to its remote location. In 1973 a road was built to the site, which opened up public access.
  • A number of stele (large stone slabs) are found within Cob? decorated with drawings and glyphs. One stele is dated November 30, 780 A.D.
  • Transportation of goods along the sacbes was done by foot, even though the Mayans had knowledge of, and an understanding about the wheel.
  • Cob? saw major construction in the settlement in the middle and late Classic period, about 500 to 900. Hieroglyphic inscriptions date from the 7th century
  • Cob? had a lot of power with the Mayan communities, which is why it is considered an important site. This power was because of the control over agriculture, trading routes, and more importantly water resources.
  • After 600 AD, the development of Chich?n Itz? changed the political influences in the Yucat?n peninsula and began eroding the dominance of Cob?. Once an influential powerhouse, Cob? focused on maintaining its spiritual and religious contributions after 1000 A.D.
  • Coba was abandoned in 1550 when the Spanish conquered the area.
  • Mexican National Institute of Anthropology & History began archeological excavations in 1972 directed by Carlos Navarrete but most of the builiding remain buried in jungle and natural debris.

Explore Coba your way!

No matter which Loco Adventure option you choose, Cob? is a day tour that will have you back to your original destination in less than 8 hours. If stopping off in local villages is part of your adventure, this will be a full 8-hour day, but it can be done in less time. Located close to Tulum, Tulum visitors can make the trip shorter. If you are in Playa del Carmen or north of Playa, the day will take longer. This trip is far less overwhelming than Chichen Itza.

Do It Yourself Coba Ruins Tour Close

Find your own way to Cob?!

This Do It Yourself Cob? tour is easy, and does not require an overly adventurous spirit. The highways to Cob? are newly paved and a dream to navigate with only two highways to follow. Our suggestions are based on departures from the Riviera Maya.

If you wish to take the ADO bus for your Cob? tour, buses leave Playa del Carmen, Cancun, and Tulum in the mornings. We suggest choosing your best departure time one day in advance at the local bus station. The bus departs from Cob? at 1:30 pm or 3:30 pm from the local restaurant El Bocadito. The walk from the Coba pueblo bus stop to the ruins is only 500 meters.

1. Book your vehicle and get ready– The night before you leave reserve your rental car, buy drinks, snacks, and fill up your gas tank. The recommended departure time is 8:00 am to avoid the tropical heat at this site. It is possible to leave later, but the heat of the midday sun can be too much for some. Get some pesos as American dollars, credit cards and Euros are not widely accepted in the small Mayan pueblos or the area around Cob?. Reliable ATM?s are located in Playa del Carmen and Tulum. Local currency will make your trip a lot easier!

2. It is time for a road trip. Have breakfast where you are staying or look for an open taco stand outside Puerto Aventuras, in Tulum. Stopping on the Tulum beach for breakfast is a great way to take in the morning. If you are get up and go kind of person, there are a few restaurants outside of the ruins that offer an early breakfast. The drive from Cancun is 3 hrs, from Playa del Carmen 2 hrs, and from Tulum 1 hr. Slip in a morning adventure meal if you are up for it! To get to Cob?, head south to Tulum and take the road to Coba just as you are entering the Tulum pueblo. This road is identified by the following landmarks; Super San Francisco Supermarket, the 7-11 and a big green road sign that points the way to Coba. Tip: If you forgot to pick up enough water and snacks, this is where you want to stop. Any of the stores mentioned have a great selection.

3. Mayan pueblos ? On the Coba Road, the local name for this highway, you will drive through three Mayan pueblos and pass lots of local artisan shops. These are great places to stop on your trip back! Watch out for the speed bumps in each of these small towns. In Spanish they are called ?topes? and they are not small bumps. After 45 minutes you will reach a roundabout that has three exits. Take the exit to Cob? and drive a few minutes to the Cob? pueblo. When you enter the pueblo of Cob?, you will see lots of little restaurants and the lagoon. The ruins are to the left of the three-way intersection at the lagoon, with secure, parking available. Parking is about 40 pesos.

4. Have breakfast or get a head start on your Cob? tour ? if you skipped breakfast in Tulum or Puerto Aventuras, we love the breakfast served at the restaurant located at the three-way intersection before we enter the ruins. Their ?horchata? (natural rice and cinnamon drink) is one of the best we have had, and their eggs are delicious. Overlooking the lagoon and malecon while updating your Cob? information is a nice way to start the day.

5. Entering the Cob? Ruins ? Take some water, a snack, sunscreen, hat and your Cob? information and it is off to the entrance. If you are not a big walker, consider hiring a tricycle with a personal chauffeur or rent a bike and pedal yourself around the site. Bike rental is 35 pesos, chauffeured tricycle is 70 pesos per hour. INAH (Instituto Nacional de Antropolog?a e Historia) certified guides can be hired to join you on your adventure for 500 pesos. We are walkers and love the walk through the ruins. There are little paths that lead to the lagoon and into the jungle but only accessible by foot. So take your pick!

6. Climb the Nohoch Mul pyramid ? Unlike other Mayan ruin sites, the pyramid at Cob?, the highest Mayan structure in the Yucatan, is still open for climbing. The steps up to the viewing platform are a challenge, but the view is worth it! Take your camera or smartphone so you can document your achievement with incredible photos.

7. Cob? cenotes ? We are big fans of the cenotes that surround Cob? on the outskirts of the village and ruins. Once you have completed your tour, hop in the car, drive around the lagoon to the west and follow the signs for the three cenotes. Entrance tickets are best purchased at the first cenote, which will give you access to all three. Your tickets must be shown at each cenote so hold onto them! These cenotes have small entrances but large cavern areas, so don?t let the entrance deceive you. Each cenote has a spiral staircase to either a limestone floor or a man-made platform. The waters are crystal clear and the formations are quite spectacular. Even if you have seen other cenotes, these are worth investigating, if not a great place to swim.

8. Drive back at your pace ? Once you are done with your Cob? tour of the ruins, local cenotes and a bite to eat, you can make your way back to your original destination. If you have been on our DIY Chichen Itza tour, these stops may sound familiar. Pick a new one option that you missed last time and experience more on this DIY tour. The proximity of Cob? to your original destination lets you wander back and investigate the area on a deeper level.

Your trip back will take you to any of these stops:

  • Shopping on the Coba Road to visit local artisans specifically Alfredo Gonzalez Castillo on the outskirts of the Francisco Uh May pueblo
  • Stop by the Tulum beach for a swim and a juice (no drinks for the driver). We suggest stopping in at Que Fresco at Zamas as it is closer to the highway and the beach is easy to access. Two great stores are located across from Zamas, Mixik and Shalom.
  • Stop in the Tulum pueblo to the south of the Coba Road for a stretch and walk down the main street. Check out Mixik, our friend Sally?s Mexican Art Store or Charlie?s Restaurant for a coffee. Charlie?s has some interesting decor that just might inspire you!
  • Pop into Akumal and have a snack on the beach at the Lol Ha Beach Bar or Buena Vida. If you have your snorkeling gear with you, seek out the turtles in the Bay.
  • Experience the Xpu Ha beach just south of Puerto Aventuras. Great views, a beach restaurant and great swimming if you want to take a dip. Take Xpu Ha EXIT 4.
  • Check out Pamuul if you are heading to Playa del Carmen. This is a quiet beachfront area with a great ocean view, restaurant and someone to share your travels with.

Once you hit your final destination, your DIY adventure is officially over! Share your photos on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter so everyone can experience your personally designed Coba adventure!

Go with Friends Close

Explore with your friends!

This is a great way to save money and travel with friends. The Go with Friends Loco Adventure combines a private van with our DIY Cob? itinerary. This option is where you are driven under your rules! The driver is not a tour guide but he will get you where you need to go in a comfortable air-conditioned van for 12!

If you feel that this is YOUR option but do not have enough Riviera Maya friends to take advantage of the savings and convenience, no worries, we have you covered. You can find LocoGringo friends on the LocoGringo Facebook Fan Page. Post on our fan page when you are thinking of traveling and see who is up to sharing the ride and the cost! LocoGringo also has a very active online forum so sign up and post a thread stating dates, costs and departure city. If you have multiple city pick-ups, no worries, the driver will coordinate the appropriate pick-ups and timing.
1. Use Locogringo social networks to share your Loco Adventure ? Outline the dates, your name, where you are staying, and where you are going! Find out from each willing traveler where they are staying (hotel and city) and obtain their personal email details so you can all plan together. Direct them to this page so they can see for themselves what the day will bring. Costs will vary depending on the amount of people you rally for the adventure. Private vans with a driver range from $280 USD to $350 USD depending on the number of hours you choose to travel.

2. Book your private van in advance and get ready– Reserve your private van through our people and they will arrange a seamless pick up. We love the drivers that take us around the Riviera Maya so we though you would enjoy the same. Bring your own drinks, snacks, and pesos, which you can buy the night before. Start your first pickup between 7:00 to 8:00 am to avoid the midday heat. If your group wishes to leave later, know you have that flexibility. Tip: American dollars, credit cards and Euros are not widely accepted on this road trip so visit an ATM and get some local currency to make your trip a lot easier! If you forgot, Tulum has reliable ATM machines in town.

3. It is time for a road trip. Have breakfast where you are staying or look for open taco stands outside Puerto Aventuras, in Tulum, or take in the stunning view of the Tulum beach over breakfast. If you are a get up and go kind of person, there are a few restaurants outside of the ruins that offer an early breakfast. The drive from Cancun is 3 hrs, from Playa del Carmen 2 hrs, and from Tulum 1 hr. Slip in a morning adventure if you are up for it! To get to Cob?, head south to Tulum and take the road to Coba just as you are entering the Tulum pueblo. This road is identified by the following landmarks; Super San Francisco Supermarket, the 7-11 and a big green road sign that points the way to Coba. Tip: If you forgot to pick up enough water and snacks, this is where you want to stop. Any of the stores mentioned have a great selection.

4. Mayan pueblos ? On the Coba road you will drive through three Mayan pueblos and pass lots of local artisan shops. These are great places to stop on your trip back! Watch out for the speed bumps in each of these small towns. In Spanish they are called ?topes? and they are not small bumps. After 45 minutes you will reach a roundabout that has three exits. Take the exit to Cob? and drive a few minutes to the Cob? ruins site. When you enter the pueblo of Cob?, you will see lots of little restaurants and the lagoon. The ruins are to the left of the three way intersection that is at the lagoon, with secure parking available. parking is about 100 pesos for a van.

5. Have breakfast or get a head start on your Cob? tour ? We love to have breakfast at the restaurant located at the three way intersection before we enter the ruins. Their ?horchata? (rice drink with cinnamon) is one of the best we have had, and their eggs are delicious. Overlooking the lagoon and malecon while updating your Cob? information is a nice way to start the day.

6. Entering the Cob? Ruins ? Take some water, a snack, sunscreen, hat and your Cob? information and it is off to the entrance. If you are not a big walker, consider hiring a tricycle with a personal chauffeur or rent a bike and pedal yourself around the site. Bike rental is 35 pesos, chauffeured tricycle is 70 pesos per hour. INAH (Instituto Nacional de Antropolog?a e Historia) certified guides can be hired to join you on your adventure for 500 pesos. We are walkers and love the walk through the ruins. There are little paths that lead to the lagoon and into the jungle but only accessible by foot. So take your pick!

7. Climb the Nohoch Mul pyramid ? Unlike other Mayan ruin sites, the pyramid at Cob?, the highest Mayan structure in the Yucatan, is still open for climbing. The steps up to the viewing platform are a challenge, but the view is worth it! Take your camera or smartphone so you can document your achievement with incredible photos.

8. Cob? cenotes ? We are big fans of the cenotes that surround Cob? on the outskirts of the village and ruins. Once you have completed your tour, hop in the car, drive around the lagoon to the west and follow the signs for the three cenotes. Entrance tickets are best purchased at the first cenote, which will give you access to all three. Your tickets must be shown at each cenote so hold onto them! These cenotes have small entrances but large cavern areas, so don?t let the entrance deceive you. Each cenote has a spiral staircase to either a limestone floor or a man-made platform. The waters are crystal clear and the formations are quite spectacular. Even if you have seen other cenotes, these are worth investigating, if not a great place to swim.

9. Drive back at your pace ? Once you are done with your Cob? tour of the ruins, local cenotes and a bite to eat, you can make your way back to your original destination. If you have been on our DIY Chichen Itza tour, these stops may sound familiar. Pick a new one option that you missed last time and experience more on this DIY tour. The proximity of Cob? to your original destination lets you wander back and investigate the area on a deeper level.

Your trip back will take you to any of these stops:

  • Shopping on the Coba Road to visit local artisans specifically Alfredo Gonzalez Castillo on the outskirts of the Francisco Uh May pueblo
  • Stop by the Tulum beach for a swim and a juice (no drinks for the driver). We suggest stopping in at Que Fresco at Zamas as it is closer to the highway and the beach is easy to access. Two great stores are located across from Zamas, Mixik and Shalom.
  • Stop in the Tulum pueblo to the south of the Coba Road for a stretch and walk down the main street. Check out Mixik, our friend Sally?s Mexican Art Store or Charlie?s Restaurant for a coffee. Charlie?s has some interesting decor that just might inspire you!
  • Pop into Akumal and have a snack on the beach at the Lol Ha Beach Bar or Buena Vida. If you have your snorkeling gear with you, seek out the turtles in the Bay.
  • Experience the Xpu Ha beach just south of Puerto Aventuras. Great views, a beach restaurant and great swimming if you want to take a dip. Take Xpu Ha EXIT 4.
  • Check out Pamuul if you are heading to Playa del Carmen. This is a quiet beachfront area with a great ocean view, restaurant and someone to share your travels with.

Once you hit your destination, your Coba adventure is officially over! Thank your driver and show him some love! Share your photos on Instagram, Facebook or Twitter so everyone can experience your personally designed Coba adventure! Remember to share photos with your Loco Adventurers as well, tagging them in the photos so they can share more of the trip!

 

Book a Guided Tour Close

Explore with a local guide and book a tour!

We understand that you may not be up for a Do It Yourself adventure. The Guided Tour option makes your adventure less stressful, easy and convenient. This Loco Adventure is a tour, with a driver, a guide, food and more! We love what YucaTreks does and they offer an awesome adventure.

We picked YucaTreks for a few reasons. Mitch and his group of guides are just like us. He has lived in the area for over 15 years, is originally from Canada and is an explorer. He loves to find cool and interesting things to do.

Yucatrek tours are effortless, provide valuable historical facts and are fun. There is nothing to plan or think about. Mitch looks after it all. You will enjoy his tour groups because they are small, intimate and designed for people like you who are looking for a more personal experience.
YucaTreks offers you the following benefits:

  • Unique and off the beaten track experiences
  • Local guides are trained in Mayan history and are registered INAH guides
  • Spend a day with passionate people who love what they do and want to share their local insights.
  • Create interesting tour stops that are cultural and local. They know the secret spots.
  • Provide an all-inclusive tour that includes entrance fees, lunch, guides, transportation, snacks, drinks and water
  • They love to have fun!

Your Day will look like this:

  • Guided tour of Coba with your group being one of the first to enter the ruins
  • Swimming stop at a local cenote
  • Lunch at a local family-owned Yucatecan restaurant on shore of Lake Coba
  • Local shopping stops on the Coba road (honey store is included)

Pick-ups are scheduled through YucaTreks directly with a specific time allocated to you or your group. Coba tours are completed every Thursday unless you have a large group. Large groups can book the van with YucaTreks and have a private tour with all the frills mentioned. How great is that!

Price is $110 USD per person for this all day tour. It is a little bit more than doing this on your own but the service and the adventure is worth it!

Contact us to reserve your tour.?

 

Tips for your Road Trip Close

Make your road trip complete with these tips!

No matter what Loco Adventure you choose, you will need some basic items to make your road trip the best it can be.

    • Hat
    • Sunscreen
    • Insect repellant
    • Water and snacks
    • Bathing Suit and towel
    • Mexican Pesos
    • Camera or smart phone
    • Copy of your Loco Adventure itinerary
    • Optional ? mask and snorkel

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